Olympics: New York Jews lambast IOC over silence

Jul 28, 2012
Publication: 
The New Age
Members of New York's Jewish community lambasted the International Olympic Committee's refusal to hold a minute of silence Friday for Israeli athletes massacred at the Munich games 40 years ago. Picture: Reuters

Members of New York's Jewish community lambasted the International Olympic Committee's refusal to hold a minute of silence Friday for Israeli athletes massacred at the Munich games 40 years ago.

"There are three words I have for the International Olympic Committee," Eliot Engel, a congressman from New York state, said at a ceremony in Manhattan. "Shame on you!"

Engel was among dozens of Israeli and Jewish-American leaders holding their own minute of silence to remember the 11 victims killed at the hands of Palestinian militants in the 1972 bloodbath .

A large board with the black and white photos of the 11 stood next to the podium on a sidewalk where speaker after speaker excoriated IOC President Jacques Rogge for ruling that no official minute of silence would be held at the opening of the London games Friday.

Among them was Avi Melamed, an unofficial coach with the Israeli swimming team in Munich who narrowly escaped death.

"It's just a moment of silence we're asking for to commemorate the first Olympic battlefield," he said, recalling the terrifying moments after gunmen burst into the Israeli residence in the Olympic Village.

Rogge, who held an impromptu minute's silence when he toured the Athletes' Village in London on Monday, says that making such a gesture during the opening ceremony would politicize the celebration.

The Munich killings were the worst violence at any Olympics.leven Israeli athletes and coaches, as well as a West German police officer, were killed during an attack and hostage-taking by the Black September group, which was seeking the release of Palestinian prisoners held in Israel.

Melamed, who had swum for Israel in the previous Olympics and was in Munich on an informal coaching basis, told reporters he remembered the shock of waking to gunfire. "I wasn't on a battlefield, or so I thought," he said.

His life was saved when a team member led militants past his room, steering the nightmare away. "Shots and mayhem and total disbelief," the soft-spoken former sportsman, now 68, said when asked to remember the initial moments.-Sapa